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New research from child psychiatrist

New research from child psychiatrist Robert Young, a child and adolescent psychiatry professor at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, reveals that marijuana is the second most commonly abused drug by child psychiatric patients after alcohol.

In a study of children admitted to an inpatient psychiatric unit at Akron Children’s Hospital in Ohio, Young found nearly 15 percent reported using pot. Of those who used marijuana, more than 60 percent also had histories of other substance abuse or mental illness.

Young presented his findings during a symposium on child and adolescent treatment advances Sunday at the American Psychiatric Association annual meeting in Honolulu. The American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry takes a similar stance on the link between young people smoking pot and developing other problems such as depression and psychosis , which Young says is related to child psychiatry patients’ use of marijuana.

“One possible explanation is that the child may be self-medicating either their psychotic symptoms or depressive symptoms,” Young said in an interview before his presentation Sunday. “We know that about 50 percent of adults with schizophrenia smoke cigarettes heavily, and there’s a similar phenomenon where kids are smoking marijuana to deal with some psychiatric illness.”

Young also reports that child psychiatric inpatients who used pot were https://www.nudz.cz/23rd-world-congress-of-the-international-association-for-child-and-adolescent-psychiatry-and-allied-professions/?month=9&year=2019  twice as likely to land in the hospital again within six months after discharge compared with children who didn’t use pot.

Alarmed by these findings, researchers at Akron Children’s Hospital plan to build on Young’s research by developing a questionnaire specifically designed for child psychiatrists to use when talking with teens about drug use.

“It’s important to get their perspective on what’s going on in their lives,” said Dr. Kathleen Pletcher, an adolescent medicine specialist at the hospital who will help develop the questionnaire. “We need to ask about marijuana and other substances, but also about things like bullying and how they’re feeling generally.”

The findings from Young’s study come amid increasing acceptance of marijuana use across the U.S. A recent Pew Research Center survey found that 52 percent of Americans think pot should be legalized, while 43 percent said it should remain illegal.

Researchers say more work is needed to understand the full impact of marijuana on child psychiatric patients, but the findings so far are worrisome.

“It does appear that there may be some increased risk for kids who are using marijuana and have psychiatric issues,” Pletcher said. “We need to study this more to see if that’s really the case.”

 

Marijuana is the second most commonly abused drug by child psychiatric patients after alcohol, according to new research from child psychiatrist Robert Young.

 

In a study of children admitted to an inpatient psychiatric unit at Akron Children’s Hospital in Ohio, Young found nearly 15 percent reported using pot. Of those who used marijuana, more than 60 percent also had histories of other substance abuse or mental illness.

Young presented his findings during a symposium on child and adolescent treatment advances Sunday at the American Psychiatric Association annual meeting in Honolulu. The American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry takes a similar stance on the link between young people smoking pot and developing other problems such as depression and psychosis.

 

“One possible explanation is that the child may be self-medicating either their psychotic symptoms or depressive symptoms,” Young said in an interview before his presentation Sunday. “We know that about 50 percent of adults with schizophrenia smoke cigarettes heavily, and there’s a similar phenomenon where kids are smoking marijuana to deal with some psychiatric illness.”

 

Young also reports that child psychiatric inpatients who used pot were twice as likely to land in the hospital again within six months after discharge compared with children who didn’t use pot.

 

Alarmed by these findings, researchers at Akron Children’s Hospital plan to build on Young’s research by developing a questionnaire specifically designed for child psychiatrists to use when talking with teens about drug use.

“It’s important to get their perspective on what’s going on in their lives,” said Dr. Kathleen Pletcher, an adolescent medicine specialist at the hospital who will help develop the questionnaire. “We need to ask about marijuana and other substances, but also about things like bullying and how they’re feeling generally.”

 

The findings from Young’s study come amid increasing acceptance of marijuana use across the U.S. A recent Pew Research Center survey found that 52 percent of Americans think pot should be legalized, while 43 percent said it should remain illegal.

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